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December 09, 2008

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Grizzly Bears Sighted On Vancouver Island

From The Vancouver Sun:

As far as anyone can remember or scientists can determine, only black bears have lived on Vancouver Island.
But this year, grizzlies have been sighted far and wide on northern Vancouver Island and the knot of smaller islands that press close against the coast between Port Hardy and Campbell River. . . .

Officials suspect three or four sub-adult male grizzlies are responsible for this year's sightings, having paddled and island-hopped their way westward from the B.C. mainland.

Comments

YooperJack

Fascinating, what extremes animals will go through to occupy a vacant niche. Wasn't that long ago when it seemed like grizzlies were in danger of extinction.
YooperJack

William

I wonder if a grizzly is anything like a polar and can swim for miles out at sea?

Don

Grizzly bears are in danger of extinction. And yes, they can swim quite a long way.

I live on one of the small islands off Vancouver Island. This island is too small to support a bear or cougar population but they do show up on occasion. They are left alone until they inevitably kill livestock at which time they are shot.

Vancouver Island is all considered prime bear and cougar territory. The entire island has been claimed by adult bears and cougars as their personal territory. Even in the cities. When a young bear or cougar looking for his own territory has been kicked from pillar to post by his seniors, that beautiful little green island only a mile or so away seems to be too great a temptation. They have been found swimming miles offshore, apparently swept out of the channels by the tides.

Don

Grizzly bears are in danger of extinction. And yes, they can swim quite a long way.

I live on one of the small islands off Vancouver Island. This island is too small to support a bear or cougar population but they do show up on occasion. They are left alone until they inevitably kill livestock at which time they are shot.

Vancouver Island is all considered prime bear and cougar territory. The entire island has been claimed by adult bears and cougars as their personal territory. Even in the cities. When a young bear or cougar looking for his own territory has been kicked from pillar to post by his seniors, that beautiful little green island only a mile or so away seems to be too great a temptation. They have been found swimming miles offshore, apparently swept out of the channels by the tides.




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