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October 08, 2008

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News Update: The Latest Lead-In-Venison Study

From the Minneapolis-St. Paul Star-Tribune:

Some lead bullets fired from high-powered rifles scatter lead fragments much farther into deer than hunters might assume, according to a Department of Natural Resources study released Tuesday.

That means the state's venison processors and 500,000 deer hunters must trim much farther from wound channels to avoid lead contamination.

Lead was found up to 18 inches from wound channels in a study on sheep conducted by the DNR in July, said Lou Cornicelli, DNR big game program leader. . . .

"Some high-velocity lead bullets break apart almost instantly, throwing small pieces of metal all over the place,'' Cornicelli said.

Be sure to check out the full story, with new details on which types of bullets fragmented and dispersed most, and new recommendation on trimming, washing, and handling your venison.

Comments

charles

While it's certainly nice to know that there is a possibility of ingesting lead when consuming wild game, several things need to be kept in mind: 1) The amount of lead that becomes bioavailable (active in the body) from ingesting lead and moving it through the digestive tract is pretty small, compared to breathing in lead-contaminated paint dust (the concern of parents everwhere); 2) The effects of lead on humans are primarily confined to cognitive development, and are generally of little danger to those of us with fully-developed brains. For those of us in our 20s+, there is little to worry about. MAYBE it wouldn't be such a hot idea to feed pounds and pounds of venison to your two year old... 3) Compared to the multitude of toxins, hormones, antibiotics, preservatives, etc. that show up in the food-lot meat on most grocery store shelves, the little bit of lead you might find in your wild-harvested deer will still leave it looking mighty healthy.

charles

While it's certainly nice to know that there is a possibility of ingesting lead when consuming wild game, several things need to be kept in mind: 1) The amount of lead that becomes bioavailable (active in the body) from ingesting lead and moving it through the digestive tract is pretty small, compared to breathing in lead-contaminated paint dust (the concern of parents everwhere); 2) The effects of lead on humans are primarily confined to cognitive development, and are generally of little danger to those of us with fully-developed brains. For those of us in our 20s+, there is little to worry about. MAYBE it wouldn't be such a hot idea to feed pounds and pounds of venison to your two year old... 3) Compared to the multitude of toxins, hormones, antibiotics, preservatives, etc. that show up in the food-lot meat on most grocery store shelves, the little bit of lead you might find in your wild-harvested deer will still leave it looking mighty healthy.

charles

While it's certainly nice to know that there is a possibility of ingesting lead when consuming wild game, several things need to be kept in mind: 1) The amount of lead that becomes bioavailable (active in the body) from ingesting lead and moving it through the digestive tract is pretty small, compared to breathing in lead-contaminated paint dust (the concern of parents everwhere); 2) The effects of lead on humans are primarily confined to cognitive development, and are generally of little danger to those of us with fully-developed brains. For those of us in our 20s+, there is little to worry about. MAYBE it wouldn't be such a hot idea to feed pounds and pounds of venison to your two year old... 3) Compared to the multitude of toxins, hormones, antibiotics, preservatives, etc. that show up in the food-lot meat on most grocery store shelves, the little bit of lead you might find in your wild-harvested deer will still leave it looking mighty healthy.

Holy Moley! Sorry on the triple post....seems the 'preview' button posts as well as the 'post' button.

Can I get some help from the webmaster?

Ed J

What I have always said, Do not use varmint bullets on anything you intend to eat.

Matt

That makes me want to keep on using the right behind the ear shot!

Elmer Fudd

we're supposed to quit eating animals that we shoot with birdshot? That's got to be a worse situation and nobody seems to be dying from that




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