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November 19, 2007

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Capsized Fisherman Survives 10 Hours in Raging North Pacific

Hurricane-like winds sank the 42-foot Pink Lady on Friday, stranding lone fisherman Alan Ryden in treacherous waters a mile offshore from the Alaska Peninsula. From the Anchorage Daily News:

Ryden, 47, floated for 10 hours and 14 miles, buoyed by a small personal flotation device amid 16-foot seas and 50-knot winds. The sun set and the moon rose as waves crashed over him. At one point, Ryden said in an interview Saturday, he shouted out over the clamor: "I'm not going to die out here."

And he didn’t, thanks to a heroic rescue by the Coast Guard.

Comments

Blue Ox

What the hell was this guy doing out there by himself?!

James

Even if he was by himself, he should have some sort of radio communication and a gps. With today's technology he should be able to let someone know his boat is sinking and let someone know exactly where he is, so he can be rescued without even getting wet

DV

Read the article. First of all, the vessel is named Pacific Lady, not Pink Lady. Secondly, the vessel is equipped with a radio over which Ryden issued a Mayday just before the vessel went down, having little time to do so. Thirdly, the boat is equipped with an Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon, which is supposed to activate when a boat sinks. As the article states: "It wasn't until six hours after Ryden went into the water that the Coast Guard would detect the automatic distress call from the emergency beacon." Consider the facts: 1. Ryden had a survival suit and knew how to utilize it. 2. At the time his boat was hit, Ryden was but a mile offshore and preparing to move the vessel to safety. 3. Despite fishing alone, Ryden was perhaps prepared as well as, if not better than, a solo hunter tracking elk in the mountains of Colorado where storms can come out of nowhere. In fact, Ryden grew up in Colorado and knows what it means to be prepared.

DV

Read the article. First of all, the vessel is named Pacific Lady, not Pink Lady. Secondly, the vessel is equipped with a radio over which Ryden issued a Mayday just before the vessel went down, having little time to do so. Thirdly, the boat is equipped with an Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon, which is supposed to activate when a boat sinks. As the article states: "It wasn't until six hours after Ryden went into the water that the Coast Guard would detect the automatic distress call from the emergency beacon." Consider the facts: 1. Ryden had a survival suit and knew how to utilize it. 2. At the time his boat was hit, Ryden was but a mile offshore and preparing to move the vessel to safety. 3. Despite fishing alone, Ryden was perhaps prepared as well as, if not better than, a solo hunter tracking elk in the mountains of Colorado where storms can come out of nowhere. In fact, Ryden grew up in Colorado and knows what it means to be prepared.

Bubba

Really sounds as if the "Fickle Finger of Fate" was just pointed in the wrong direction that day!
The fact that he was able to remain calm enough to get out with the equipment necessary just to survive is amazing!

Bubba




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