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August 28, 2007

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DU Needs Hunter’s Help to Save Native Grasslands

Demand for ethanol is putting greater pressure on native grasslands, which support millions of the continent’s ducks. According this Ducks Unlimited press release, we have the opportunity to protect this habitat through the farm bill via a Sodsaver provision that would eliminate all federal payments for crops planted on land with no previous cropping history. The Senate will draft it’s version of the farm bill in September. Click here to read more and to contact your state’s Senators.

Comments

Dylan

I have a feeling that the ethanol craze is going to do irrepairable damage to almost all the still remaining native countryside. It isn't the answer. People think that with the gas shortage the most sensible thing to do is use more ethanol. The fact is we are running out of our under ground water because of irrigation to grow corn. The Oglala aquifer which runs from the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota all the way to Texas (I believe?), is the main source of water for many of the corn growing states. It has depleted drastically. Which would your rather run out of gas or water? If our fresh water sources run out we are left with the ocean. It is sooooo expensive to desalinize water that we will end up paying more for gallon of water than a gallon of gas. Did anybody know that regular prairie grass can be used to make ethanol. In fact there is more biomass in grass hay fields than in a corn field. THe only reason we don't use them instead is because modifications will need to made to the ethanol plants in order to process grass. I think it would be worth it in the end. Anyway I strayed from the subject. Contact your state Senator and ask them to help protect the prairie pothole region and others from being torn up for ethanol.




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