« Killer Alligator: Female jogger stalked and killed by Florida gator | Main | Still Fishing: 105-year-old angler gives hope to us all »

May 15, 2006

This page has been moved to http://www.fieldandstream.com/blogs/field-notes

If your browser doesn’t redirect you to the new location, please visit The Field Notes at its new location: www.fieldandstream.com/blogs/field-notes.

What Sportsmen Think About Global Warming: A National Opinion Poll

A survey recently conducted for the National Wildlife Federation shows an overwhelming majority of hunters and fishermen agree with the consensus in the scientific community that global warming is real, that it already is eroding their quality of life, and that it poses a definite threat to the future of two things they love: fish and wildlife.

Note that this was not a poll of liberal-leaning sportsmen; 73 percent of respondents consider themselves conservative to moderate on political issues. The survey was conducted by the research firm Responsive Management, whose client list includes numerous fish and game agencies and the National Shooting Sports Foundation (click here for a description of the methodology).

Check out the highlighted results by scrolling down, or click here to see the full survey. And let your opinions be known by writing in your comments in the box provided at the bottom of this entry. You can also tell the NWF where you stand on the issue by taking their online followup survey here.


1: Global warming is defined as the rise in temperature of the Earth’s atmosphere. Do you agree or disagree that global warming is currently occurring?
6_1


2: Have you observed any of the following conditions where you live?
4_412


3: Do you agree or disagree that global warming is primarily caused by pollution from burning fossil fuels?
7_1


4: Global warming is a serious threat to fish and wildlife.
8_1


5: Global warming is a serious threat to humans.
9_1


6: The U.S. should reduce its emissions of greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide that contribute to global warming and threaten fish and wildlife habitat.
14_1


7: Congress should pass legislation that sets a clear national goal for reducing global warming pollution with mandatory timelines because industry has already had enough time to clean up voluntarily.
16_2


8: Is the country on the right track or the wrong track when it comes to global warming?
27_1


Who took this survey?
The selected questions below provide a picture of the typical respondent to this survey.

1: On political issues, do you consider yourself conservative, moderate, or liberal?
41_3


2: Whom did you vote for in the 2004 Presidential election? 46


3: Overall, how would you rate the importance of fishing or hunting to you personally, on a scale of 0 to 10, where 0 is not at all important and 10 is extremely important?

Mean = 7.5
Percent giving rating of 10: 28%


4: Respondent's age

65 years or older 22%
55-64 years old 22%
45-54 years old 25%
35-44 years old 15%
25-34 years old 4%
18-24 years old 5%
Don’t know 3%
Refused 4%

5: Respondent’s gender

Male 75%
Female 25%

Click the link below to view the survey in its entirety, click on the comments button below to tell us what you think about the results, or visit the National Wildlife Federation's special global warming web site, www.targetglobalwarming.org, which they are calling "a place where hunters and anglers can connect with other sportsman to talk about the effects of global warming, and what can be done about it."

Demographic information

1: Overall, how would you rate the importance of fishing or hunting to you personally, on a scale of 0 to 10, where 0 is not at all important and 10 is extremely important?

Mean = 7.5
Percent giving rating of 10: 28%

2: Respondent’s gender (not asked, but observed by interviewer).

Male 75%
Female 25%

3: May I ask your age?

65 years or older 22%
55-64 years old 22%
45-54 years old 25%
35-44 years old 15%
25-34 years old 4%
18-24 years old 5%
Don’t know 3%
Refused 4%

4: Do you consider yourself an evangelical Christian?

Yes 50%
No 39%
Don’t know 5%
Refused 6%

5: Do you consider your place of residence to be a large city or urban area, a suburban area, a small city or town, a rural area on a farm or ranch, or a rural area NOT on a farm or ranch?

Large city or urban area 14%
Suburban area 17%
Small city or town 25%
Rural area on a farm or ranch 15%
Rural area NOT on a farm or ranch 22%
Don’t know 2%
Refused 4%

6: How many children, age 17 or younger, do you have living in your household?

No children 67%
1 child 14%
2 children 8%
3 children 5%
4 children 1%
Don’t know 2%
Refused 3%

7: Do you consider yourself a farmer, a rancher, or both?

Farmer 9%
Rancher 2%
Both 3%
Neither 81%
Don’t know 1%
Refused 4%

8: Are you a member of a labor union?

Yes 16%
No 78%
Don’t know 2%
Refused 4%

Questions about the respondents' politics

9: On political issues, do you consider yourself conservative, moderate, or liberal?

Conservative 36%
Moderate 37%
Liberal 11%
Don’t know 9%
Refused 7%

10: What is your political affiliation?

No political affiliation / Independent / moderate 29%
Republican 27%
Democrat 31%
Other 1%
Don’t know 3%
Refused 10%

11: Are you a registered Republican? (Asked of those whose affiliation is Republican.)

Yes 77%
No 19%
Don’t know 4%
Refused 0%

12: Are you a registered Democrat? (Asked of those whose affiliation is Democrat.)

Yes 88%
No 8%
Don’t know 4%
Refused 0%

Respondents' perceptions of global warming

13: Global warming is defined as the rise in temperature of the Earth’s atmosphere. Do you agree or disagree that global warming is currently occurring?

Strongly agree 47%
Moderately agree 29%
Neither agree nor disagree 3%
Moderately disagree 5%
Strongly disagree 7%
Don’t know 8%

14: Do you agree or disagree that global warming is primarily caused by pollution from burning fossil fuels?

Strongly agree 30%
Moderately agree 26%
Neither agree nor disagree 5%
Moderately disagree 12%
Strongly disagree 11%
Don’t know 17%

15: Global warming is a serious threat to fish and wildlife. (Do you agree or disagree with this statement?)

Strongly agree 48%
Moderately agree 23%
Neither agree nor disagree 2%
Moderately disagree 11%
Strongly disagree 11%
Don’t know 6%

16: Global warming is a serious threat to humans. (Do you agree or disagree with this statement?)

Strongly agree 45%
Moderately agree 24%
Neither agree nor disagree 2%
Moderately disagree 11%
Strongly disagree 12%
Don’t know 6%

17: Global warming is an urgent problem requiring immediate action. (Do you agree or disagree with this statement?)

Strongly agree 46%
Moderately agree 21%
Neither agree nor disagree 3%
Moderately disagree 12%
Strongly disagree 13%
Don’t know 5%

18: Global warming threatens the economy and jobs across the nation. (Do you agree or disagree with this statement?)

Strongly agree 30%
Moderately agree 23%
Neither agree nor disagree 1%
Moderately disagree 17%
Strongly disagree 17%
Don’t know 10%

19: Which of the following statements comes closest to your view?

Global warming is already beginning to impact hunting and fishing conditions 34%
Global warming will impact hunting and fishing conditions in future generations 39%
Global warming will have little or no impact on hunting and fishing conditions, and concern about it is overblown 23%
Don’t know 4%

20: Addressing global warming should be a high priority. We can improve the environment and strengthen the economy by investing in clean, renewable energy technologies that create jobs while reducing global warming pollution. (Do you agree or disagree with this statement?)

Strongly agree 58%
Moderately agree 24%
Neither agree nor disagree 2%
Moderately disagree 6%
Strongly disagree 8%
Don’t know 2%

21: The U.S. should reduce its emissions of greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide that contribute to global warming and threaten fish and wildlife habitat. (Do you agree or disagree with this statement?)

Strongly agree 52%
Moderately agree 26%
Neither agree nor disagree 2%
Moderately disagree 5%
Strongly disagree 9%
Don’t know 6%

22: The U.S. should be a world leader in addressing global warming. (Do you agree or disagree with this statement?)

Strongly agree 60%
Moderately agree 20%
Neither agree nor disagree 2%
Moderately disagree 5%
Strongly disagree 10%
Don’t know 4%

23: Congress should pass legislation that sets a clear national goal for reducing global warming pollution with mandatory timelines because industry has already had enough time to clean up voluntarily. (Do you agree or disagree with this statement?)

Strongly agree 51%
Moderately agree 24%
Neither agree nor disagree 2%
Moderately disagree 8%
Strongly disagree 11%
Don’t know 4%

24: Legislation to address global warming should include funding to protect fish, wildlife, and their habitat from the impacts of global warming. (Do you agree or disagree with this statement?)

Strongly agree 54%
Moderately agree 22%
Neither agree nor disagree 1%
Moderately disagree 6%
Strongly disagree 11%
Don’t know 5%

25: Should the federal government provide incentives, such as tax breaks and subsidies, to companies that develop new energy efficient technologies that reduce global warming?

Strongly agree 57%
Moderately agree 27%
Neither agree nor disagree 1%
Moderately disagree 4%
Strongly disagree 9%
Don’t know 2%

26: Is the country on the right track or the wrong track when it comes to global warming?

Right track 26%
Wrong track 43%
Don’t know 31%

Respondent's personal observations of global warming and its effects

27: In your personal experience, would you say the quality of hunting and fishing habitats has improved, stayed the same, or gotten worse within the past few years?

Improved 22%
Stayed the same 31%
Gotten worse 42%
Don’t know 5%

28: How concerned are you that the wildlife or fish populations in the areas where you typically hunt or fish will decrease significantly or disappear in the next 10 years?

Very concerned 44%
Somewhat concerned 27%
Not at all concerned 27%
Don’t know 2%

29: Have you observed any of the following conditions where you live?

Earlier spring? 37%
Earlier bloom times? 32%
Hotter summers? 39%
Warmer, or shorter winters? 54%
Drying wetlands? 28%
Unusual drought? 30%
Less snow? 36%
Less ice cover on ponds, lakes, or rivers? 28%
None of these 24%

30: Do you believe that (seasonal weather condition given in the above question) that you have observed (is/are) related to global warming?

Yes 54%
No 22%
Don’t know 24%

31: Have you observed any of the following conditions where you live?

More wildfires, forest fires, or brush fires? 15%
Unusual flooding? 13%
More intense storms, including hurricanes? 31%
Changing migratory bird patterns? 15%
Decreasing bird, fish, or wildlife populations? 35%
New pests or invasive species? 20%
None of these 38%

32: Do you believe that (natural disaster/wildlife condition(s) given in the above question) that you have observed (is/are) related to global warming?

Yes 44%
No 35%
Don’t know 21%

Questions about America's energy policy:

33: Which of the following do you think is the best way to address America’s energy needs?

Drilling for more oil and gas in the U.S., including areas within wildlife refuges and other public lands, to increase our domestic energy supply. 15%
Conserve more, waste less, and develop more fuel-efficient vehicles so we use less oil and gas. 27%
Rely less on oil and gas and expand development of renewable forms of energy like wind, solar, and ethanol. 51%
Don’t know 7%

34: President Bush said in his State of the Union address that “America is addicted to oil”. Do you agree or disagree with this statement?

Strongly agree 69%
Moderately agree 12%
Neither agree nor disagree 1%
Moderately disagree 7%
Strongly disagree 8%
Don’t know 3%

35: Are the Administration and Congress doing enough to break America’s addiction to oil? (Asked of those who agree that America is addicted to oil.)

Yes 6%
No 86%
Don’t know 8%

36: Is the country on the right track or the wrong track in meeting our national energy needs?

Right track 18%
Wrong track 69%
Don’t know 13%

37: Should the federal government provide incentives, such as tax breaks and subsidies, to industries to replace some energy from oil, gas, and coal with renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power?

Strongly agree 61%
Moderately agree 25%
Neither agree nor disagree 1%
Moderately disagree 4%
Strongly disagree 7%
Don’t know 1%

38: Should the federal government provide incentives, such as tax breaks and subsidies, to make energy conservation technologies more affordable for citizens?

Strongly agree 69%
Moderately agree 18%
Neither agree nor disagree 1%
Moderately disagree 4%
Strongly disagree 7%
Don’t know 1%

Questions about respondents' voting habits

39: Are you currently a registered voter?

Yes 82%
No 11%
Don’t know 2%
Refused 5%

40: During Presidential election years, would you say that you vote always, usually, sometimes, rarely, or never?

Always 64%
Usually 11%
Sometimes 7%
Rarely 5%
Never 5%
Don’t know 2%
Refused 6%

41: During non-Presidential election years, would you say that you vote always, usually, sometimes, rarely, or never?

Always 44%
Usually 20%
Sometimes 13%
Rarely 8%
Never 8%
Don’t know 2%
Refused 6%

42: Did you vote in the 2004 Presidential election?

Yes 77%
No 15%
Don’t know 2%
Refused 6%

43: Whom did you vote for in the 2004 Presidential election? (Of those who voted.)

George W. Bush 53%
John Kerry 29%
Ralph Nader 0%
Other 0%
Don’t know 2%
Refused 16%

44: Do you plan to vote in the 2006 non-Presidential election this November?

Yes 76%
No 9%
Don’t know 8%
Refused 6%

45: In general, how much of an influence do candidates’ conservation policies or views have on your actual voting behavior? Would you say they have a major influence, a minor influence, or no influence?

Major influence 37%
Minor influence 43%
No influence 17%
Don’t know 3%

46: Which candidate for office you would be more likely to favor. (Note that the order of candidate position was randomized to eliminate question order bias.)

Candidate A believes we must take action now to reduce pollution contributing to global warming and supports strong laws.
Candidate B believes more study is needed on global warming and believes there should only be voluntary responses rather than government regulation. Which candidate would you be more likely to favor?

“Strong laws” candidate 64%
“More study” candidate 28%
Don’t know 8%

The McCain/Lieberman Climate Stewardship and Innovation Act
The following six questions asked about support or opposition to five elements of the proposed McCain/Lieberman Climate Stewardship and Innovation Act (S.342, H.759) and then about overall support or opposition to the bill.

47: The bill would provide $500 million annually to state wildlife agencies for fish and wildlife conservation. Do you support or oppose this element of the bill?

Strongly support 58%
Moderately support 26%
Neither support nor oppose 1%
Moderately oppose 5%
Strongly oppose 7%
Don’t know 3%

48: The bill would provide funding to boost research and development of advanced clean energy technologies, including new ways of using crops from America’s farms to create fuels that substitute for oil. Do you support or oppose this element of the bill?

Strongly support 70%
Moderately support 22%
Neither support nor oppose 1%
Moderately oppose 2%
Strongly oppose 4%
Don’t know 1%

49: The bill would provide funding to America’s auto industry to help retool auto plants to incorporate the latest gas-saving technologies. Do you support or oppose this element of the bill?

Strongly support 49%
Moderately support 22%
Neither support nor oppose 2%
Moderately oppose 8%
Strongly oppose 17%
Don’t know 2%

50: The bill would provide funding to develop a new generation of advanced nuclear power plants. Do you support or oppose this element of the bill?

Strongly support 32%
Moderately support 26%
Neither support nor oppose 6%
Moderately oppose 12%
Strongly oppose 18%
Don’t know 7%

51: The bill would provide payments to farmers and landowners who conserve soil and plant trees for reforestation. Do you support or oppose this element of the bill?

Strongly support 64%
Moderately support 21%
Neither support nor oppose 2%
Moderately oppose 6%
Strongly oppose 6%
Don’t know 2%

52: Overall, do you support or oppose legislation with the provisions in the McCain/Lieberman bill?

Strongly support 34%
Moderately support 43%
Neither support nor oppose 6%
Moderately oppose 6%
Strongly oppose 4%
Don’t know 8%

#

Methodology
Responsive Management conducted this national survey of hunters and anglers on behalf of the National Wildlife Federation.  The survey was administered in March through April, 2006.  A total of 1,031 telephone interviews were completed:  212 interviews with those who fished only, 148 interviews with those who hunted only, and 671 interviews with those who both fished and hunted.  The interviews were only of those 18 years of age and older. 

For the survey, telephones were selected as the preferred sampling medium because of the universality of telephone ownership.  To ensure the integrity of the telephone survey data, Responsive Management has interviewers who have been trained according to the standards established by the Council of American Survey Research Organizations.  Interviews were conducted Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Saturday noon to 5:00 p.m., and Sunday from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., local time.  A five-callback design was used to maintain the representativeness of the sample, to avoid bias toward people easy to reach by telephone, and to provide an equal opportunity for all to participate.  When a respondent could not be reached on the first call, subsequent calls were placed on different days of the week and at different times of the day.  The software used for data collection was Questionnaire Programming Language 4.1. 

The analysis of data was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software as well as proprietary software developed by Responsive Management.  The data were weighted to represent the actual nationwide population of anglers only, hunters only, and those who participated in both activities.  Sampling error was + 3.05 percentage points at a 95 percent confidence level.  The proportions of hunters only, anglers only, and hunter/anglers was designed to correspond with the most recent (2001) National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife Associated Recreation conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Census Bureau. 

Comments

Larry

well, looks like there isn't much else to say re: global warming after reading the comments posted..the majority feel global warming is a lot of hype, which I also believe..so no more crazy surveys asking people who don't know anything about global warming..

Yves Calvert

2/16/07 As the blizzard of snow and ice pummels the Northeast after crippling the Midwest, and waves of Arctic cold fronts drop much of our Country below subfreezing temperatures, the question is, where is this so called "Responsive Management" research firm which conducted this survey? Is the "National Wildlife Federation" blind to the tactics of those dangerous fanatics claiming global warming and pushing pseudo science for political gain?

Doug

Yes there is Global Warming and Global Cooling. I agree. Here's an article I found- there are many more by climatologists, meteorologists and scientists. Read on.
Since the mid-19th century, the mean global temperature has increased by 0.7 degrees Celsius. This slight warming is not unusual, and lies well within the range of natural variation. Carbon dioxide continues to build in the atmosphere, but the mean planetary temperature hasn't increased significantly for nearly nine years. Antarctica is getting colder. Neither the intensity nor the frequency of hurricanes has increased. The 2007 season was the third-quietest since 1966. In 2006 not a single hurricane made landfall in the U.S.
South America this year experienced one of its coldest winters in decades. In Buenos Aires, snow fell for the first time since the year 1918. Dozens of homeless people died from exposure. In Peru, 200 people died from the cold and thousands more became infected with respiratory diseases. Crops failed, livestock perished, and the Peruvian government declared a state of emergency.
Unexpected bitter cold swept the entire Southern Hemisphere in 2007. Johannesburg, South Africa, had the first significant snowfall in 26 years. Australia experienced the coldest June ever. In northeastern Australia, the city of Townsville underwent the longest period of continuously cold weather since 1941. In New Zealand, the weather turned so cold that vineyards were endangered.
Last January, $1.42 billion worth of California produce was lost to a devastating five-day freeze. Thousands of agricultural employees were thrown out of work. At the supermarket, citrus prices soared. In the wake of the freeze, California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger asked President Bush to issue a disaster declaration for affected counties. A few months earlier, Mr. Schwarzenegger had enthusiastically signed the California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006, a law designed to cool the climate. California Sen. Barbara Boxer continues to push for similar legislation in the U.S. Senate.
In April, a killing freeze destroyed 95 percent of South Carolina's peach crop, and 90 percent of North Carolina's apple harvest. At Charlotte, N.C., a record low temperature of 21 degrees Fahrenheit on April 8 was the coldest ever recorded for April, breaking a record set in 1923. On June 8, Denver recorded a new low of 31 degrees Fahrenheit. Denver's temperature records extend back to 1872.
Recent weeks have seen the return of unusually cold conditions to the Northern Hemisphere. On Dec. 7, St. Cloud, Minn., set a new record low of minus 15 degrees Fahrenheit. On the same date, record low temperatures were also recorded in Pennsylvania and Ohio.
Extreme cold weather is occurring worldwide. On Dec. 4, in Seoul, Korea, the temperature was a record minus 5 degrees Celsius. Nov. 24, in Meacham, Ore., the minimum temperature was 12 degrees Fahrenheit colder than the previous record low set in 1952. The Canadian government warns that this winter is likely to be the coldest in 15 years.
Oklahoma, Kansas and Missouri are just emerging from a destructive ice storm that left at least 36 people dead and a million without electric power. People worldwide are being reminded of what used to be common sense: Cold temperatures are inimical to human welfare and warm weather is beneficial. Left in the dark and cold, Oklahomans rushed out to buy electric generators powered by gasoline, not solar cells. No one seemed particularly concerned about the welfare of polar bears, penguins or walruses. Fossil fuels don't seem so awful when you're in the cold and dark.
If you think any of the preceding facts can falsify global warming, you're hopelessly naive. Nothing creates cognitive dissonance in the mind of a true believer. In 2005, a Canadian Greenpeace representative explained “global warming can mean colder, it can mean drier, it can mean wetter.” In other words, all weather variations are evidence for global warming. I can't make this stuff up.
Global warming has long since passed from scientific hypothesis to the realm of pseudo-scientific mumbo-jumbo.
Written by- David Deming a geophysicist, an adjunct scholar with the National Center for Policy Analysis, and associate professor of Arts and Sciences at the University of Oklahoma.




Our Blogs



Syndicate