About The Author


Kim Hiss, an associate editor at Field & Stream, has hunted ducks, antelope, turkeys, and deer throughout the country, enjoying a number of women's hunts along the way. She lives in Dobbs Ferry, New York. Click here to email Kim.

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September 04, 2007

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Speaking of Dinner...

Because you can’t really talk about hunting without talking about cooking, I’ll be posting regular recipes on the blog. Thanks to those of you who’ve provided some already—they sound pretty great to me.
      First up is Lou Alexander from Wichita, Kansas. She sent me the following comments on non-hunting neighbors and cooking, and also provided a great recipe that can be used with deer or game birds. Enjoy! –K.H.

      My favorite non-meat eating, anti-hunting person is a neighbor of ours. When we first met, we were at a party at someone's house. I was standing behind my husband when I heard him start talking about a beaver mount we have. This neighbor stuck her fingers in her ears and started going, “La, la, la, la, don't say anymore, I'm a PETA member.” Boy do we know how to impress the neighbors!
  Anyway, this person is a walking contradiction. She doesn’t eat meat (I think more because she just doesn't like it), although she’ll serve hot dogs and chicken to her kids. But she has new leather seats in her kitchen and my all time favorite is that she wears leather shoes because, “Pleather hurts my feet.” We have lots of fun giving her crap for her inconsistencies. We seem to have a don't ask, don't tell policy about our hunting.
  My husband and I also get together with some friends and have game night. We enjoy trying new ways to cook game, and get the occasional treat of a less common meat, since we don't all hunt the same things. You can't beat good food and good friends.

Ginger Steak

My favorite recipe is called Ginger Steak. It was intended for beef, but I’ve found it’s awesome on deer and game birds.

1/2 cup vegetable oil
1/2 cup soy sauce
4 cloves garlic minced
4 tablespoons (1/4 cup) sugar
2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoons Accent
1 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger or 1 grated ginger root

Mix all ingredients and allow to sit for 30 minutes (or more)

Marinate Times:
Deer Steaks: 8 - 10 hours
Pheasant or Quail: 3 hours
Beef or Chicken: 1 1/2 hours

Grill over medium heat; be careful of flare-ups from the oil.

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Comments

Sarah Rogstad

Ever year when we deer hunt in Wisconsin we do all our own processing so when we do we get to cook the tenderloins that very day.(yum)
We cut the meat in to cubes
add 2 cans of beer(Wisconsin for you)
at least a lb of butter.
4-5 green peppers
3 onions
salt and pepper to taste.
We cook it on a resterant style griddle but I have also done it in a big stew pot.
When doing it in a stew pot I brown the meat with the butter and also add potatoes.
What a nice treat to have after a successful season.

ANewMe2B

I have not cooked many dishes with venison outside of fried cube steak, bacon wrapped grilled tenderloin, or sausage jumbalaya, but I have to admit my VERY favorite is deer jerky. I make about 4 big batches a year and put portions of it in FoodSaver bags and freeze it. I have also put them in canning jars and sealed the jars by sucking the air out of the jar with the food saver. My husband can eat his weight in deer jerky. We usually use the hind quarter for the jerky. Jerky is fairly easy if you invest in a jerky knife. I usually get up 3 times in the night to check it so the batch of jerky some how always makes me proud because I feel like it got my total attention... I know that is kooky.

The secret to my jerky is cracked peppercorn and smoke sauce--oh, and an awesome food dehydrator.

ANewMe2B

I have not cooked many dishes with venison outside of fried cube steak, bacon wrapped grilled tenderloin, or sausage jumbalaya, but I have to admit my VERY favorite is deer jerky. I make about 4 big batches a year and put portions of it in FoodSaver bags and freeze it. I have also put them in canning jars and sealed the jars by sucking the air out of the jar with the food saver. My husband can eat his weight in deer jerky. We usually use the hind quarter for the jerky. Jerky is fairly easy if you invest in a jerky knife. I usually get up 3 times in the night to check it so the batch of jerky some how always makes me proud because I feel like it got my total attention... I know that is kooky.

The secret to my jerky is cracked peppercorn and smoke sauce--oh, and an awesome food dehydrator.

Jen

I decided to buy a dehydrator to make deer jerky. I have heard so many different opinions on how long to marinate and how long to leave in the dehydrator. I was just wondering what is really the best times for both? I'm new to the whole deer meat thing so the recipes help a lot, thanks for the postings.

Jen

I decided to buy a dehydrator to make deer jerky. I have heard so many different opinions on how long to marinate and how long to leave in the dehydrator. I was just wondering what is really the best times for both? I'm new to the whole deer meat thing so the recipes help a lot, thanks for the postings.