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February 22, 2006

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A New Old Scope: Is Redfield making a comeback?

If you can remember when rock n’ roll was young, you can remember that Redfield was one of our top domestic riflescopes—maybe the best. Redfields had three knurled rings on their optical-lens bells, and you saw them and smiled. But in the 1970s Redfield hit the skids. It went though a series of ownerships, and its quality and reputation declined steadily, to the point where today the brand is forgotten and discredited.

But this is not the end for Redfield. Three years ago the Redfield name—there was little else left—was purchased by Meade Instruments, a U.S. maker of high-end optical products. Last year at the SHOW Show, a new line of Redfield scopes was announced, but failed to materialize.

This year, Meade had three or four toolroom scopes to look at, and they are highly interesting instruments. The full Redfield line will feature 6 models—three with 1-inch tubes and three with 30mm tubes. The 1-inchers come in 5X-25X (No, that is not a misprint—all six Redfields feature a 3-cam zooming system and a 5X magnification range.), 3X-15X, and 3X-15X with a 52mm objective. The 30mm scopes are made in 6X-30X, 4X-20X, and 4X-20X with a 56mm objective.

They are simply loaded with wonderful features, including true one-piece tubes from stem to stern, highly advanced glass, and side-focus parallax adjustment (“dial a dog,” as the phrase goes).

These are not cheap scopes. Prices range from $700 to $900. But, if Redfield can actually get them into production, free of bugs and defects, they should be a hit. Redfield was once a great name. Maybe it will be again.

Comments

Mike Clifford

This blog was passed along to me by one of your editors, and I've included it on the Heartland Outdoorsman Outdoor Bloggers Network page, with a feed.
Keep up the great work David!
http://www.heartlandoutdoorsman.com/blog

E. David Quammen

Certainly hope that Redfield/Meade makes a strong come-back. It is about time for another good American scope manufacturer. Have used some old Redfields and the quality is good.

David Wright

I have two Redfields from the 70's. One was (questionably) refurbished by Redfield at no charge several years ago, and it's still on top of a Rem 700 of the same vintage. I don't think these scopes compete well with the optics and mechanics available today in the better scopes, but I'm excited that Meade is resurrecting the Redfield name. Back then if you had a Redfield you had a real scope on your hands, and would be proud to lean it up against a tree at deer camp.

lynn  madsen

just purchased a 270 short magnum in a browning a-bolt. looking for some advice on a good quality scope to complete the gun. most of my hunting is whitetails and moose in manitoba.anyadvice would be greatly appreciated. also rumor has it our newly elected govt. is considering scrapping our gun registry.

Steve Young

Careful about that talk about removal of gun registry restictions. Hilter would have never stood for that?

Benjamin Kimm

But where are the low powered scopes?

Marvin W. Reavis

I check with McBrides Gun Shop of Austin, Texas and others that may sell used scopes often to see if some of the old Redfield scopes are for sale. One of the best was the Redfield Illuminator. I still have a 3 x 9 Redfield that was purchased in 1963 and was the first scope on the market to have a non magnifing reticule. It still works well, but fogs up. It is on a Model 69 Winchester bolt action and is great. I have a Weaver Scope that my Dad put on his new Winchester Model 88 in 1957. It is now on a Winchester Model 74 and is used for spot lighting racoons. The Model 88 Winchesters serial number is something like 00473. This rifle rhode over a central Texas ranch in the gun rack of 4 Chevrolet Pickups that had a total mileage of one million. The pickups are long gone, but the rifle is still hunting deer in the hands of a brother-in-law.

Pat Altentaler

Have an old (mid 80's) Redfield 2 1/2 Pwr. pistol scope that has a front glass rattle. Is there anyone that repairs these or is it not worth the trouble and expense? I want to put it on a just aquired T/C Contender in .204 Ruger

bill pentangelo

have an old redfield 12x scope with the 3 knurled rings on the optics end. has a # L13249 on it. how can I find out its worth? is their a scope bible?

regards

Bill Pentangelo

Tyler Cromeens

I have a Redfield 3x9 variable acutract which I purchased in the late 70s. I would like to put it on a 270 but I lost the instructions for it. Do you have any in fo on it? Any help is welcome.

lloyd naugle

were can i get a red field scope repaired

John T. Jeffery

I am researching an old rifle for a friend. A Redfield 3X9 with a 1" tube, and range estimator reticle is mounted on this rifle. The rifle itself is a 1935 Winchester Model 64 (SN 1091787). The external metal on the scope has turned a yellowish-green. Can the manufacture date of the scope be determined by the serial number (SN 221421)? I have tried and failed to find a web site that provides this information for the scope like they do for the rifle. Thank you!

andrew heyward

john t.jeffery, if your friend ever decides to sell his redfield scope,please let me know. thanks from andy aheyward@webtv.net

zach

just aquired redfield scope need info on it please help

Jim in Mo

What sort of help?

DOUG SALYER

I BOUGHT A GUN WITH A 3X9 REDFIELD SCOPE. BELOW THE CROSSHAIRS WHEN YOU LOOK THRU TEH SCOPE IS A BAR SCALE. IT DISAPPEARS INTO THE BOTTOM OF THE SCOPE. THE SCALE HAS YARDS(?) ON IT AND GOES UP TO 500 OR 600. THE CROSSHAIRS DOES NOT COME IN CONTACT WITH THE SCALE. HOW DO YOU USE THIS SCALE? IT PROBABLY HAS SOMETHING TO DO WITH ESTIMATING THE DISTANCE OF AN OBJECT AND USING THE SCALE BUT WHAT IS THE RELATIONSHIP OF THE SCALE AND THE CROSSHAIRS IF ANY? HOW WOULD THE SCALE BE PUT ON THE TARGET? HELP? THANKS.

Del in KS

Doug,

If memory serves there are two horizontal lines in that reticle and you place a bucks chest between them, turn the dial til it fits and read the yardage at the bottom. Anyway it is a rangefinder for hunting. Been about 30 years since I had one.




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